CONTACTS
Phone: +7 (495) 285 72 72
E-mail: info@romanovdvor.com
Address: 4 Romanov Pereulok, Moscow, Russia, 125009

History

The quarter in which Romanov Dvor is located today appeared at the end of the Middle Ages, at the turn of the 16-17th centuries. One of the first owners was Ivan Romanov, the uncle of the first tsar of the Romanov dynasty. After that, the estate passed into the possession of Lev Naryshkin, whose name is associated with the emergence of the "Naryshkin Baroque" in architecture, which combined Russian traditions and European trends. At the turn of the 18-19th centuries, Count Sheremetyev, one of the richest people of his time, became the owner. However, soon, during a fire in 1812, the estate burned down, and the appearance of the quarter completely changed under the leadership of the architect and restorer Fyodor Richter. Later, the Moscow City Duma moved to the Sheremetyevs' estate, and at the end of the 19th century, the "Hunting Club" was opened, whose members at one time became Golitsyn, Chekhov, Stanislavsky and others.

The estate, named after its first owner Ivan Romanov, became a new secular place. It held exhibitions of art workers, rehearsals of the Moscow Art Theater, party conventions, lectures and balls.
XVI-XVII
Centuries
The first estates and
the European enclave

In the 16th century, ROMANOV DVOR was the location of the estates of representatives of the court nobility and large service nobility. The territory received a special status and content at the beginning of the 17th century, when Ivan Romanov became the owner.
XVII-XVIII
Centuries
Progressiveness
and patronage

Formation of the “Naryshkinsky style”, combining the traditions of Russian architecture and current European style and construction trends. Expansion of the main building by Kirill Razumovsky in the middle of the 18th century.
XVIII-XIX
Centuries
Prosperity,
fire and rebirth

The “Second House of Pashkov” was built. At the beginning of the 19th century, the estate was acquired by Count Sheremetyev. For 20 years, all buildings were restored under the guidance of the architect Fyodor Richter.
XIX-XX
Centuries
Administrative, cultural and educational quarter and the “Hunting Club”

In 1891, the “Second House of Pashkov” was transferred to Moscow University. In 1892, after the City Duma moved to a newly built building on Voskresenskaya Square, the main building of the Sheremetevs’ estate was rented by the “Hunting Club”.